Ramblecast: Deadman’s Corner

Part One:

Part Two:

Part Three:

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My next book is out on March the 18th. It’s called Notebook.

10 thoughts on “Ramblecast: Deadman’s Corner

  1. Very much enjoyed being able to follow much of your walk on the map – being a bit of a map junkie. And thanks for explaining why my husband is going thin on top, having had an impressive head of hair when we were students at UEA.

  2. Tis the embittered and neglected River Gods and Goddesses who desire human lives. The Dart is in good company, the Thames and Severn are voracious (someone once told me that the Severn’s name is derived from it’s taking seven a year). Some of these spirits have names, such as Peg Powler who inhabits the River Tees in County Durham and lures children. Iron Age people would appease the River Gods with gifts of all kinds including valuable metal objects, and human remains. One of the brooks leading into the Thames at London revealed many skulls dating from the IA, which may have been offerings. Love the Ramblecasts – always thought provoking.

  3. Lots of thoughts provoked by this latest Ramblecast. I am going to think of my self from now on as being ‘turned around by the arms of nature’ into the direction of Spring. Editing as chiselling. And not least I remembered a moss story to share. Last year I had just parked next to the cattle grid at the top of the lane that goes up to Smeardon Down from Peter Tavy and I was rootling around in a pile of rocks nearby, near the field gate, trying to find a suitable place for a quick wee before starting my bike ride. The moss around and about was not so much a green welly boot on each rock, more like furry cushions. You couldn’t see the stones underneath. Amazingly though, one of the mossy rocks was not a rock at all. Somebody had abandoned a folded child’s car seat there, and over time the moss has completely covered it so it is now a thing of beauty.
    Tempted to sign off as ‘One Of The Nine’.

    1. That’s brilliant. I love that. Any guesses as to how old the child’s seat was? And thank you for being one of the nine, Angela.

      1. Hello again Tom
        I don’t think the seat was that old, from its style and construction, and that thought makes me strangely happy! Next time I am there I am going to photograph it as an example of the quiet power of nature.

  4. I take it the arms of nature didn’t dump a huge amount of white stuff on you today. No signs of spring here.

    Thank you for yesterday’s ramblecast offering. Whether intended or not, you always make me chuckle. X

  5. Maybe it’s because we are a desert, with the same rainfall as Jordan here in Cambridge, that we have heads resembling the bare parched landscape of our industrially ravaged earth.

    Thank you for your ramble casts, it’s a comfort to dream of mossy dampness.

  6. You really make me laugh! I came across you, by chance, when I was looking after an elderly man, who used to be the head of serious crime for the South of the country, back in the 50’s. He had a lot of great stories about the Kray twins, and how they used to communicate using the local phone boxes..he developed surveillance tech..very interesting guy, who sadly passed away last year. He gifted me one of your books..21st Century Yokel, which he thought I may enjoy. Sadly, it sat on my ‘to read’ pile (which is large) for over a year! He was right though, I really did enjoy it and love your writing style. Loving your musings on Dartmoor, as many of the places are known to me. Keep up the great work, and I look forward to getting stuck in to more of your books. Kindest Regards Clare x

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